How Many Hard Inquiries Will Affect Your Credit Score?

How Many Hard Inquiries Will Affect Your Credit Score

You might be asking yourself: “How many hard inquiries will affect your credit score?” To delve into the answer, we will take a closer look at what inquiries are, the difference between hard and soft inquiries, and how it might affect your credit score.

How Many Hard Inquiries Will Affect Your Credit Score?

What Are Inquiries?

When you apply for credit, you allow lenders to ask for your credit report from a bureau. When you check your credit report after that, you might see that credit inquiries are listed. You may also see listed there inquiries by businesses that you’re unaware of. However, the only kinds of inquiries that count toward your FICO Score are the ones resulting from your new credit applications.

Applying for credit can have an impact that varies based on each person’s unique credit history. For the most part, credit inquiries have only a minor impact on FICO Scores. One additional credit inquiry will typically dock fewer than five points off the FICO Scores.

Inquiries can have a larger impact if you have few accounts or a short credit history. Many inquiries also means more risk. Statistically, anyone with six inquiries or more on their credit reports can be up to 8 times more likely to declare bankruptcy than those with zero inquiries.

While inquiries can play a part in assessing risk, they play only a minor part. More crucial factors for your credit score? How well you pay your bills on time, as well as your overall debt burden that shows up on your credit report. So, how many hard inquiries will affect your credit score?

Hard vs. Soft Inquiries

Hard inquiries typically happen when a lender or credit issuer, checks your credit report when making a decision regarding lending. They usually take place when you apply for a loan, credit card or mortgage. Furthermore, you typically need to authorize them.

Hard inquiries can lower your credit score by a couple of points and might remain on your credit report for two years. Luckily, as time goes on, the damage to your credit score typically decreases or vanishes altogether—often even before the hard inquiry disappears from your report.

Inquiries are labeled as either “hard” or “soft.”

When you apply for credit, every hard inquiry can drop your credit score by a few points. However, when you shop around for auto, student or mortgage loans in a short time frame, it leads to a single inquiry. Thus, this lessens the damage to your score from having several credit checks.

On the other hand, your score won’t be impacted by a soft inquiry. This type of inquiry can occur when you get a copy of your own credit report. (You can check your own credit history as many times as you’d like, and it won’t impact your score.) This is because you are not viewed as looking for new credit. Rather, you are demonstrating responsible credit management practices. Soft inquiries will also not appear for lenders who pull your credit history.

Banks and other institutions, meanwhile, do see hard inquiries. A lender’s inquiry usually means a consumer is taking on additional debt, which can result in extra credit risk and a lower credit score. For someone with a strong credit history, zero delinquencies, and so forth, an inquiry may have no effect on your score. For someone with late payments or other major credit issues, an inquiry can affect the score by a few points.

Here’s where the question “how many hard inquiries will affect your score?” comes in. Those hard inquiries can accumulate.

A single hard inquiry has a minor impact on a credit score, but that impact multiplies with every extra inquiry. Thus, consumers must avoid applying for multiple new credit or loan accounts over a short window of time, to help ensure that they don’t appear desperate for credit to lenders.

How Many Hard Inquiries Will Affect Your Credit Score?

Even if inquiries cause a one-point change in your score, they will be listed as a factor that affects your score.

To avoid credit score damage from multiple hard inquiries over a short time, scoring models recognize that borrowers often “shop around” for the best loan. Seeking a mortgage, auto or student loan may cause several lenders to request your credit report, despite the fact you are only looking for one loan.

Inquiries for mortgage loan and auto loan purposes in a certain period of time—usually 14 days—counted as a single inquiry by most scoring systems. For those purposes, a limit to inquiries does not exist.

While auto, mortgage and student loan applications over a short period of time are treated as one single inquiry, that is not the case for credit cards.

Therefore, every new credit card inquiry can perhaps hurt your credit score (although it’s by less than 5 points each for the most part). Don’t randomly apply for new credit cards. Rather, when credit card shopping, do your homework. Compare rates, terms and features offered by lenders. Then, only apply for the card(s) that best meet your personal needs.

Credit inquiries generally won’t prevent you from borrowing. As long as your report displays a clean record of timely payments, low debt levels and is free from damaging errors, don’t worry about having your credit checked once in awhile.

Need to know more about how many hard inquiries will affect your credit score? Let us know! To enlist the help of a trustworthy, effective credit repair company, contact Go Clean Credit today.


No matter what your situation, Go Clean Credit has a solution. We have many credit repair programs that are available to help you overcome your credit situation and place you back on the path to financial success. Real credit restoration is not a once size fits all model and we tailor your needs to the right program, but most people can start for just $99 per month.

We have fixed price programs that get you back on track in as little as 5 months, debt resolution solutions, programs geared toward people who have had recent short sales or foreclosures and many others. Help is just a free phone call away, or you can fill out an appointment request.  to schedule a free consultation today.

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